Ayahuasca Ceremonies Aya Quest


Today is such a special gift as it is all we truly have to work with, tomorrow is unknown and the past we can not change, but we can accept its lessons and move on.

True healing puts into order the body, mind and spirit with the past, present and future. What kind of agent or method or formula or treatment can help to effect such sweeping, integrated healing? Ayahuasca is that Agent in my humble opinion.

The vine Banisteriopsis caapi, also known as “the vine of the soul,” contains a group of compounds called harmala alkaloids. These compounds are MAO inhibitors. They prevent the activity of naturally-occurring agents in our bodies called monoamine oxidase. Think of MAO’s as doormen standing in front of the night club of your brain. Psychoactive compounds, notably the potent vision-inducing agent DMT, want to get into the club and attach themselves to your brain’s receptors. But the MAO doormen prevent this from happening. The harmala alkaloids in Banisteriopsis caapi, however, tell the doormen to take a nice log coffee break. They do. That’s when the Psychotria viridis, rich in DMT (N,N Dimethyl Tryptamine), comes into play. DMT is the most potent vision-inducing agent known. And oddly, DMT is not only found in many hundreds of plants all around the world, but it is also manufactured in our own bodies. But thanks to MAO’s, we do not trip on DMT all day long.

While ayahuasca ceremonies vary from one shaman to another and from one tribal tradition to the next, certain features remain constant. According to the native explanation, a well-conducted ayahuasca ceremony brings together the ayahuasca brew, the shaman(s), and the plant spirits. This triune force effects healing, and opens up the doors of the spirit world to the participant.

In some ceremonies, the shaman(s) sit quietly with the participants in the dark for about forty-five minutes or so after drinking, as the effects of the ayahuasca start to come on. However, some shamans begin to sing and make ethereal whistling sounds as soon as the brew has been drunk. Some shamans wave chacapas — noisy leaf fans — and others do not. It is typical for the shaman to blow smoke of potent Amazonian tobacco (called mapacho) on participants, to cleanse the atmosphere and to establish an aura of protection. Aya Quest prefers Sage.

Aya Quest Native Americas Church prefers a hands off approach as much as possible so you may find your path, if you become over whelmed our staff is there for you.

Steve Hupp

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